Alpine grazing: does it reduce blazing?

Williams R.J., Papst W.A., McDougall K.L., Mansergh I.M., Heinze D., Camac J.S., Nash M.A., Morgan J.W., Hoffmann A.A. (2014) Alpine ecosystems. In: Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring, Challenges and Direction. (Eds: Lindenmayer D, Burns

Aim: 
To summarise the nature of environmental change in Australian alpine environments, with particular reference to policy development and implications.
Type of Study: 
Review
Key Results: 
Changes in the balance between shrubs, grasses and forbs in alpine vegetation can be substantial, and depend on interactions between disturbance and species life history. Alpine vegetation of mainland Australia has a strong capacity to regenerate after large fires such as those of 2003. Grazing by domestic livestock does not reduce the incidence or severity of fire in Australian alpine ecosystems.
Treatments: 
N.A.
Response: 
There is no scientific basis for the use of domestic livestock to mitigate fire risk in the Australian Alps. Grazing of domestic livestock in alpine environments has well-documented environmental costs.
Models: 
N.A.
Comments: 
Comprehensive and up to date review of envirnomental change in Australian alpine environments. Book explicitly written for practical application in environmental management and policy development.
Reviewer: 
Imogen Fraser; Dick Williams
Locations: 
Australian Alps bioregion
Response variable : 
Various relating to both flora (e.g. biomass, vegetation cover) and fauna (e.g. counts).
Replication: 
N.A.
Ecosystem: 
Treeless alpine and high subalpine ecosystems.
Survey: 
N.A.
Full Reference: 
Williams R.J., Papst W.A., McDougall K.L., Mansergh I.M., Heinze D., Camac J.S., Nash M.A., Morgan J.W., Hoffmann A.A. (2014) Alpine ecosystems. In: Biodiversity and Environmental Change: Monitoring, Challenges and Direction. (Eds: Lindenmayer D, Burns E, Thurgate N, Lowe A) pp 169-214. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne.