Alpine grazing: does it reduce blazing?

Williamson G.J., Murphy B.P., Bowman D.M.J.S. (in press) Cattle grazing does not reduce fire severity in eucalypt forests and woodlands of the Australian Alps, Austral Ecology early online

Aim: 
Determine "whether fire severity in eucalypt forests and woodlands in the alpine bioregion is reduced in areas subject to cattle grazing."
Type of Study: 
Pre-existing contrasts
Key Results: 
Crown scorch was strongly related to vegetation type but there was no evidence that cattle grazing reduced fire severity.
Treatments: 
Spatial layers include: grazing (grazed and ungrazed), vegetation type (wet eucalypt forest, dry eucalypt forest or woodland), slope and aspect.
Models: 
Spatial layers include: grazing (grazed and ungrazed), vegetation type (wet eucalypt forest, dry eucalypt forest or woodland), slope and aspect.
Comments: 
Companion paper to Williams et al. 2006. Demonstrates that cattle grazing did not reduce the severity of the 2003 and 2007 fires in woodlands and forests in the Victorian Alpine National Park.
Reviewer: 
Imogen Fraser; Dick Williams
Locations: 
The Alpine National Park, Victoria, Australia
Response variable : 
Fire severity (crown fire, severe, moderate or light scorch).
Replication: 
2,922 points for the 2003 fires, and 2,564 points for the 2007 fires.
Ecosystem: 
Wet eucalypt forests, dry eucalypt forests and woodlands.
Full Reference: 
Williamson G.J., Murphy B.P., Bowman D.M.J.S. (2013) Cattle grazing does not reduce fire severity in eucalypt forests and woodlands of the Australian Alps, in review.