Australia’s species extinction crisis in numbers: 2019

Renwick A. R., Robinson C. J., Garnett S. T. et al. (2017) Mapping Indigenous land management for threatened species conservation: An Australian case-study. PLoS One. 12, e0173876.

Aim: 
To investigate the potential management of threatened terrestrial and freshwater species in Australia on Indigenous land, and the importance of this land for threatened species management.
Type of Study: 
Research paper (mapped species distribution from online sources and databases).
Key Results: 
Overall, 51.3% of threatened species habitat ranges occur on Indigenous land, and 74.3% of all threatened species have some part of their modelled range on Indigenous land. Mammals cover the largest area of range on Indigenous land (57.4%), then reptiles (43.3%), birds (42.9%), frogs (23.1%), and fishes (18.1%). Frogs have the highest percentage of species with some range on Indigenous land (85.7%), followed by mammals (82.3%), birds (73.8%), reptiles (68.9%), and fishes (57.5%). Fifty one percent of the range of threatened species occurs on Indigenous land. In areas where Indigenous people have established conservation co-management partnerships, only 4% of threatened species ranges are covered. Thirty two percent of threatened species ranges occur where Indigenous people have negotiated to take part in conservation management. For all species except reptiles, the coastal areas of Indigenous lands held the highest amount of threatened species.
Reviewer: 
Mitchell Cowan
Full Reference: 
Renwick A. R., Robinson C. J., Garnett S. T. et al. (2017) Mapping Indigenous land management for threatened species conservation: An Australian case-study. PLoS One. 12, e0173876.