Climate change: underwater forest decline

Feary D. A., Pratchett M. S., J Emslie M., Fowler A. M., Figueira W. F., Luiz O. J., Nakamura Y. & Booth D. J. (In press) Latitudinal shifts in coral reef fishes: why some species do and others do not shift

Aim: 
Review of factors likely to influence latitudinal shifts in tropical fishes, including larval supply, settlement and post-settlement processes
Type of Study: 
Review
Key Results: 
Tropical vagrant species are more likely to originate from high-latitude populations; tropical sifhes with large body size, high swimming ability, large size at settlement and pelagic spawning behaviour are more likely to successfully settle into temperate habitats. Habitat and food limitation at settlement and within juvenile stages may constrain the incursion of tropical fish species that depend on coral resources.
Treatments: 
Vagrant and non-vagrant tropical fishes
Response: 
n/a
Models: 
Logistic regressions, GLMM
Comments: 
Focus on ray-finned fishes that breed within tropical coral reef habitats with larvae that settle into temperate reefs
Reviewer: 
Adriana Vergés
Locations: 
World wide
Response variable : 
Fish abundance in source habitats (coral reefs) and in temperate reefs. Plankton larval duration, body size, reproductive strategy, larval swimming ability, size at settlement of tropical vagrant and tropical non-vagrant fishes
Replication: 
Variable
Ecosystem: 
Temperate reef
Full Reference: 
Feary D. A., Pratchett M. S., J Emslie M., Fowler A. M., Figueira W. F., Luiz O. J., Nakamura Y. & Booth D. J. (In press) Latitudinal shifts in coral reef fishes: why some species do and others do not shift