Demise of the dingo

CN Johnson and AR Wallach (2016) The virtuous circle: predator-friendly farming and ecological restoration in Australia. Restoration Ecology 24, 821-826.

Aim: 
To assess the outcomes of lethal dingo control and outline new, non-lethal ways to manage predator-livestock conflict.
Type of Study: 
Opinion article
Key Results: 
Protection of dingoes, Australia's apex predator, has the potential to be a powerful tool in ecological restoration, but is stifled in large part due to the view that they are a threat to livestock production. Lethal control of dingoes is common but often fails to benefit livestock, because it does not consistently reduce dingo populations or livestock predation, and because it can drive land degradation and reduce forage availability for livestock. Predator-friendly farming is a growing practice worldwide that can improve the sustainability, profitability, and social acceptability of livestock production.
Treatments: 
NA
Response: 
Promoting the transition to nonlethal standards in Australian grazing enterprises could support ecological restoration goals and wild animal welfare on a vast scale.
Models: 
NA
Reviewer: 
Euan Ritchie
Locations: 
Australia
Response variable : 
NA
Replication: 
NA
Ecosystem: 
Multiple
Full Reference: 
CN Johnson and AR Wallach (2016) The virtuous circle: predator-friendly farming and ecological restoration in Australia. Restoration Ecology 24, 821-826.