Demise of the dingo

Greg Campbell, Andrew Coffey, Heather Miller, John L. Read, Anthony Brook, Peter J.S. Fleming , Peter Bird, Steve Eldridge and Benjamin L. Allen. (2018) Dingo baiting did not reduce fetal/calf loss in beef cattle in northern South Australia. Animal Produc

Aim: 
ascertain the magnitude and variability in fetal/calf loss in northern South Australia and to evaluate whether or not contemporary dingo-baiting practices affected this loss. Key alternative explanations for fetal/calf loss were also explored.
Type of Study: 
manipulative experiment
Key Results: 
The overall scale and timing of fetal/calf loss was not correlated with dingo activity, time of year, a satellite-derived measure of landscape greenness (normaliseddifference vegetation index), or activity of alternative dingo prey." Dingo baiting may be ineffective at protecting calves northern South Australia Three cattle herds, over 2-4 years arid Fetal/calf loss 4 sites Baited/unbaited Frequentist Euan Ritchie Forsyth DM, Woolnough AP, Nimmo DG, Ritchie EG, Kennedy M, Pople A, Watson I. (2014) A comment on the influence of dingoes on the Australian sheep flock. Australian Veterinary Journal, 92: 461-462. Reply to Allen BL, West P. Influence of dingoes on sheep distribution in Australia. Aust Vet J 2013;91:261–267. Reply, including data The importance of dingoes as a cause of the decline in Australia's sheep flock has been overstated
Response: 
Reduced investment in dingo management highlighted by Allen and West is a symptom rather than a cause of the declining profitability of sheep farming in Australia's rangelands
Reviewer: 
Euan Ritchie
Locations: 
National
Ecosystem: 
Rangelands
Full Reference: 
Greg Campbell, Andrew Coffey, Heather Miller, John L. Read, Anthony Brook, Peter J.S. Fleming , Peter Bird, Steve Eldridge and Benjamin L. Allen. (2018) Dingo baiting did not reduce fetal/calf loss in beef cattle in northern South Australia. Animal Production Science https://doi.org/10.1071/AN17008