Demise of the dingo

Wang Y. & Fisher D. O. (2012) Dingoes affect activity of feral cats, but do not exclude them from the habitat of an endangered macropod. Wildlife Research 39, 611-20.

Aim: 
examine whether dingoes might spatially or temporally suppress the activity of feral cats at a sitecontaining the sole wild population of an endangered macropod subject to feral cat predation.
Type of Study: 
Correlational with no pre-determined gradient or contrast
Key Results: 
We did not find evidence that cats were spatially excluded from areas of high prey activity by dingoes, but there was low overlap in activity times between cats and bridled nailtail wallabies.
Treatments: 
Dingo v. cat, dingo v. kangaroo, dingo v. smaller macropod species, cat v. smaller macropod species.
Response: 
Findings support the contention that fear of dingoes can sometimes affect the timing of activity of feral cats. However, cats showed little spatial avoidance of dingoes at a coarse scale. Control of dingoes should not be abandoned at the site, because the potential moderate benefits of reduced cat activity for this endangered and geographically restricted wallaby may not outweigh the detrimental effects of dingo predation.
Models: 
Model selection and Frequentist.
Reviewer: 
Aaron Greenville
Locations: 
Taunton National Park(11 626 ha) in central Queensland
Response variable : 
index of abundance, mean time
Replication: 
41 cameras
Ecosystem: 
Arid zone
Full Reference: 
Wang Y. & Fisher D. O. (2012) Dingoes affect activity of feral cats, but do not exclude them from the habitat of an endangered macropod. Wildlife Research 39, 611-20.