Venter O. et al. (2016) Sixteen years of change in the global terrestrial human footprint and implications for biodiversity conservation. Nature Communications 7, 12558.

Venter O. et al. (2016) Sixteen years of change in the global terrestrial human footprint and implications for biodiversity conservation. Nature Communications 7, 12558.

Aim: 
To use the human footprint framework to compile remotely sensed and bottom-up survey information on eight variables measuring the direct and indirect human pressures on the environment in 1993 and 2009.
Type of Study: 
original research using available data on infrastructure, land cover, and human access
Key Results: 
While the human population has increased by 23% and the world economy has grown 153%, the human footprint has increased by just 9%. Still, 75% the planet’s land surface is experiencing measurable human pressures. Moreover, pressures are perversely intense, widespread and rapidly intensifying in places with high biodiversity.
Models: 
GLMs
Reviewer: 
Keren Raiter
Locations: 
Global
Response variable : 
global terrestrial human footprint
Ecosystem: 
Terrestrial ecosystems
Survey: 
Global
Full Reference: 
Venter O., Sanderson E. W., Magrach A., Allan J. R., Beher J., Jones K. R., Possingham H. P., Laurance W. F., Wood P., Fekete B. M., Levy M. A. & Watson J. E. M. (2016) Sixteen years of change in the global terrestrial human footprint and implications for biodiversity conservation. Nature Communications 7, 12558.