Howland, B., D. Stojanovic, I. J. Gordon, A. D. Manning, D. Fletcher and D. B. Lindenmayer (2014). "Eaten out of house and home: impacts of grazing on ground-dwelling reptiles in Australian grasslands and grassy woodlands." PLoS ONE 9(12): e105966.

Howland, B., D. Stojanovic, I. J. Gordon, A. D. Manning, D. Fletcher and D. B. Lindenmayer (2014). "Eaten out of house and home: impacts of grazing on ground-dwelling reptiles in Australian grasslands and grassy woodlands." PLoS ONE 9(12): e105966.

Aim: 
Investigated the relationship between (1) density of native eastern grey kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, and grass structure, and (2) grass structure and reptiles (i.e. abundance, richness, diversity and occurrence)
Type of Study: 
Pre-existing contrasts
Key Results: 
Reptile abundance, species richness and diversity were highest where grazing intensity was low. No species of reptile was more likely to occur at high grazing intensities. Legless lizards (Delma impar, D. inornata) were more likely to be detected in areas subject to moderate grazing intensity, whereas one species (Hemiergis talbingoensis) was less likely to be detected in areas subject to intense grazing.
Treatments: 
None
Response: 
To maximize reptile abundance, species richness, species diversity, and occurrence of several individual species ofreptile, managers will need to subject different areas of the landscape to moderate and low grazing intensities and limit the occurrence and extent of high grazing.
Models: 
P values, HGLMM
Locations: 
Various conservation areas in ACT, NSW and Victoria
Response variable : 
counts
Replication: 
127
Ecosystem: 
grassland and grassy woodland
Full Reference: 
Howland, B., D. Stojanovic, I. J. Gordon, A. D. Manning, D. Fletcher and D. B. Lindenmayer (2014). "Eaten out of house and home: impacts of grazing on ground-dwelling reptiles in Australian grasslands and grassy woodlands." PLoS ONE 9(12): e105966.