Manning, A. D., R. B. Cunningham and D. B. Lindenmayer (2013). "Bringing forward the benefits of coarse woody debris in ecosystem recovery under different levels of grazing and vegetation density." Biological Conservation 157(0): 204-214.

Manning, A. D., R. B. Cunningham and D. B. Lindenmayer (2013). "Bringing forward the benefits of coarse woody debris in ecosystem recovery under different levels of grazing and vegetation density." Biological Conservation 157(0): 204-214.

Aim: 
Examined the effect of experimentally adding Course Woody Debris, in four different treatments, on reptile abundance in temperate woodlands in south-eastern Australia – one of the most highly degraded vegetation types on the continent. They investigated the influence that varying grazing pressure and vegetation density had on those effects.
Type of Study: 
manipulative experiment
Key Results: 
Reduction of grazing was the most effective way of increasing small skink abundance in high density vegetation.
Treatments: 
Herbivore exclusion fence, addition of woody debris
Response: 
Reducing grazing can have an additive effect in open and mid-density vegetation situations, but our result indicated that in high density vegetation it is the key management tool for increasing skink abundance.
Models: 
P values, cross-sectional linear mixed models
Locations: 
Goorooyarroo and Mulligans Flat nature reserves, ACT
Response variable : 
counts
Replication: 
24
Ecosystem: 
grassy woodland
Full Reference: 
Manning, A. D., R. B. Cunningham and D. B. Lindenmayer (2013). "Bringing forward the benefits of coarse woody debris in ecosystem recovery under different levels of grazing and vegetation density." Biological Conservation 157(0): 204-214.