Barton, P. S., A. D. Manning, H. Gibb, J. T. Wood, D. B. Lindenmayer and S. A. Cunningham (2011). "Experimental reduction of native vertebrate grazing and addition of logs benefit beetle diversity at multiple scales." Journal of Applied Ecology 48(4): 943

Barton, P. S., A. D. Manning, H. Gibb, J. T. Wood, D. B. Lindenmayer and S. A. Cunningham (2011). "Experimental reduction of native vertebrate grazing and addition of logs benefit beetle diversity at multiple scales." Journal of Applied Ecology 48(4): 943

Aim: 
(i)Do differences in vertebrate grazing affect the trophic structure of beetle assemblages?(ii) Does the addition of logs interact with grazing level to affect beetle diversity at the hectare scale? (iii) Does microhabitat structure provided by logs interact with grazing level to affect beetle diversity at small scales because of a localized ‘refuge’ effect?
Type of Study: 
manipulative experiment
Key Results: 
A reduction in grazing level had benefits for the abundance and species richness of beetles at the site scale. Further benefits were achieved at both site and microhabitat scales when logs are used in combination with exclosure fencing.
Treatments: 
Herbivore exclusion fence
Response: 
Our results have shown that reducing kangaroo densities toc. 0.4 animals per hectare (40 animals per km2) had significant positive effects on beetle assemblages and therefore suggests population densities near this figure would be beneficial for the restoration and maintenance of this component of the insectfauna.
Models: 
P values, GLMM
Locations: 
Goorooyarroo nature reserve, ACT
Response variable : 
counts, species richness
Replication: 
24
Ecosystem: 
grassy woodland
Full Reference: 
Barton, P. S., A. D. Manning, H. Gibb, J. T. Wood, D. B. Lindenmayer and S. A. Cunningham (2011). "Experimental reduction of native vertebrate grazing and addition of logs benefit beetle diversity at multiple scales." Journal of Applied Ecology 48(4): 943-951.