Meers, B. T. and R. Adams (2003). "The impact of grazing by Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) on vegetation recovery after fire at Reef Hills Regional Park, Victoria." Ecological Management & Restoration 4(2): 126-132.

Meers, B. T. and R. Adams (2003). "The impact of grazing by Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) on vegetation recovery after fire at Reef Hills Regional Park, Victoria." Ecological Management & Restoration 4(2): 126-132.

Aim: 
(i) determine the grazing patterns of the Eastern Grey Kangaroo after fire at Reef Hills Regional Park, and (ii) determine the impacts that grazing might have on post fire woody shrub recovery.
Type of Study: 
manipulative experiment
Key Results: 
Preferential grazing by Eastern Grey Kangaroos occurred on small burnt plots compared to adjacent unburnt areas as determined by faecal pellet counts. On burnt areas, there was a significant reduction in shrub diversity on grazed plots compared to ungrazed plots.
Treatments: 
grazing exclusion plots, fire
Response: 
As part of the planning of an ecological burning regime for remnants such as Reef Hills Regional Parks, we strongly recommended that larger burns of up to 200 ha (approximately 10% of the Park per burn) be conducted, followed by further investigation of grazing pressure and the effects on vegetation recovery.
Models: 
P values, ANOVA
Locations: 
Reef Hills Regional Park, Victoria
Response variable : 
counts, species richness
Replication: 
4
Ecosystem: 
Box-Ironbark Forests and Woodlands
Full Reference: 
Meers, B. T. and R. Adams (2003). "The impact of grazing by Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) on vegetation recovery after fire at Reef Hills Regional Park, Victoria." Ecological Management & Restoration 4(2): 126-132.