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Opportunities for students

The ESA publishes student and volunteer opportunities on our website, in our weekly e-news, and via social media.

You can find a list of current student opportunities below.

If you would like to promote a student opportunity or volunteer opportunity please upload the details via our Opportunity Listing Form - it's free.

Alternatively, if you would like to advertise a job or employment opportunity, we invite you to advertise with us for a fee of $40.

Latest Student Opportunities

PhD Scholarship in Vertebrate Ecology

Closes:
Friday, January 24, 2020

The Opportunity
Monash University invites expressions of interest for a PhD scholarship covering all fees and a tax-free stipend ($27,872 p.a.).

Closes:
Monday, December 16, 2019

Funded-PhD in tropical ecology / conservation
Joint-program at the University of Queensland & SUSTech (China)
Simple application due on 19 October, start date will be in Oct 2020

Closes:
Friday, October 18, 2019

We are looking for a highly motivated candidate to undertake a 3-year research-driven PhD program in koala physiological ecology and/or remote sensing and/or bioenergetic modelling of koala food resource quality commencing in 2019. The successful candidate will be part of a broader project with common goals. Given the multidisciplinary nature of the project, we encourage applicants with interest and expertise in vertebrate nutritional ecology, physiological ecology (particularly thermal and metabolic physiology), remote sensing and/or species distribution modelling to apply.

Closes:
Monday, September 30, 2019

Would you like to undertake a PhD program at Australia’s most research intensive university? Are you interested in the role of biodiversity in supporting agriculture? Here is an opportunity to conduct research on aspects of crop pollination by bees in Australian agriculture, at the Fenner School of Environment and Society at the Australian National University. We are working on two related areas.

Closes:
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

The School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences is offering two exciting PhD opportunities in fire ecology. The successful candidates will work closely with members of several research groups including the Fire and Biodiversity Group and the Biodiversity Dynamics Research Group. Top-up scholarships of $24,500 ($7,000 per year over 3.5 years) are available.

Closes:
Monday, September 30, 2019

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) environmental science discipline invites applications for a PhD student (domestic or international) to work on an ARC funded project in the Bega Valley of New South Wales.

The PhD candidate will study interactions between vertebrates, invertebrates and plants in the lowland grassy woodlands of the Bega Valley. Working in the context of a large experiment with supervisors from both QUT and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL in Switzerland, project objectives are to broadly:

Closes:
Monday, September 30, 2019

These projects will suit students with interest and knowledge in plant evolutionary ecology, environmental physiology and/or ecological and evolutionary genetics

Closes:
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Australia has the unenviable distinction of having the highest rate of mammal extinctions globally in the past 200 years. Introduced predators (cats and foxes) are considered the main driver of Australia's mammal loss. Efforts to reintroduce native mammal populations have been most successful when introduced predators are removed, particularly through fencing. However, recent research suggests that reintroduced threatened mammals can have profound effects on ecosystems that are still being realized.

Closes:
Friday, August 30, 2019

The science and practice of restoration ecology has advanced rapidly in recent years, with significant progress in our ability to establish vegetation. More recently, rewilding, the return of “keystone" fauna, has come to the fore. It is now recognized that the success of restoration in returning not only biodiversity, but also ecosystem function, depends very much on the interplay of species. Despite their vast diversity and importance in ecosystem function, invertebrates and microbes have largely been neglected in a restoration context.

Closes:
Friday, August 30, 2019

This trans-disciplinary PhD project offers the opportunity to bring together different knowledge types and theory to improve the monitoring and management of natural ecosystems. The successful PhD student will develop national and international case studies in collaboration with conservation scientists and economists, both in academia and in practice.

Closes:
Sunday, September 8, 2019

We are looking for a highly motivated candidate with research interests in the integration of conservation science into management action for an exciting project investigating the role of scientists within conservation management agencies.

Closes:
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Little is known about the ecology of trout in Australia despite their environmental, economic and social importance. Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) and Rainbow Trout (Oncorhyncus mykiss) were introduced to southern Australia for recreational fishing in the 1800s, and over 1 million are released into lakes and impoundments annually. These species are highly valued by recreational fishers and provide considerable social and economic benefit to regional Victoria.

Closes:
Sunday, September 1, 2019

PLEASE FORWARD TO ANY PROMISING ECOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OR FORESTRY GRADUATES!

Closes:
Monday, August 12, 2019

The Australian Tropical Herbarium is starting a new research group in plant biosecurity and the newly appointed researchers, Daniel Montesinos and Matt Barrett, are accepting candidatures for PhD, Masters and Honours candidates to study the ecology, evolution, and biogeography of invasive plants. The research would involve field, lab, and greenhouse work, and will offer the opportunity to learn a diverse array of technical skills including population and community ecology, reproductive biology, physiology, cytogenetics, genetics, or statistics.

Closes:
Monday, September 30, 2019

The Research Project
Tasmania is experiencing escalated development of its coastal regions, with greater use of coastal waters for industry and recreational activities, as well as the value placed on the pristine nature of our coasts.

Closes:
Sunday, August 11, 2019

The health and economic impact of recent outbreaks of Cholera, Zika virus and influenza underline the urgency of understanding how diseases spread and transmit. Transmission efficiency of many diseases is related to the density of the host populations. Lower host densities slow disease spread, until host densities are insufficient to maintain infection. Support for the existence of such host-density thresholds under which diseases cannot spread comes primarily from theory, with only a few empirical case studies.

Closes:
Saturday, August 10, 2019

This project aims to address the significant knowledge gap of how species composition may change due to extreme drought, and in-turn, quantify the loss of ecosystem function resulting from species turnover. Further, this project will identify species that contribute the most to function.

Closes:
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Feral deer are an emerging issue for the management of endangered ecological communities. There is a significant gap in our knowledge about the impacts of deer on Australian plant communities which limits the development of adequate management options for protecting threatened plant communities where deer invade. The project needs cross-institutional connections and this project will make important links with agencies concerned with conservation in the broader Illawarra region.

Closes:
Thursday, October 17, 2019

We are seeking applicants for two PhD Scholarships, one at the University of Tasmania (Hobart, Tasmania, Australia) and the other at Murdoch University (Perth, Western Australia). The project revolves around replicated field experiments across a range of agricultural catchments in northern Tasmania and south-west Western Australia.

Closes:
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Rufous (Lagorchestes hirsutus) and banded hare-wallabies (Lagostrophus fasciatus) have been translocated to Dirk Hartog Island from nearby Bernier and Dorre Islands, as part of an ongoing ecological restoration project. Although both species are exclusively herbivorous, rufous hare-wallabies are thought to be grazers, while banded hare-wallabies are believed to be more generalist browsers. The diet of these species may reflect the impact that they have on the ecological restoration of Dirk Hartog Island.

Closes:
Thursday, August 15, 2019

While Australia is a global centre for bird pollination, there is comparatively little evidence for pollination systems specialised on mammal pollination. The honey possum is a specialist nectarivore, endemic to the south-west Australian biodiversity hotspot, where they were originally common in sandplain habitats dominated by Proteaceae and Myrtaceae. While it has long been speculated that plants may be adapted specifically to pollination by honey possums, this hypothesis has never been rigorously tested.

Closes:
Sunday, July 7, 2019