ESA Bulletin

The Bulletin contains news relevant to ecologists and includes regional reports, research projects, notification of events and conferences, and international news. Members are encouraged to contribute to this quarterly publication.

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Download the March 2018 Bulletin.

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The latest ESA Bulletin is available for you to download and enjoy.

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Coping with 'A World of Wounds' (John Benson); Mental health of tertiary students (Michelle Walter); ESA President Don Driscoll's letter to Premier Berijiklian and more…

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The Ecological Society of Australia is delighted to announce a new partnership with the Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment. Each year, the fund supports around 200 post-graduate students to conduct research in ecology, wildlife management, and natural history studies. The first round of applications are now open, and close on 31 March. Individual grants up to $22,500 (up to $7500 per year for up to 3 years) are available.

Read more in our March edition.

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Welcome to the new look ESA Bulletin. Regular readers will have noticed a change to the type of content being featured. In the last issue, we featured three articles on how the Australian federal election might affect our funding, but the majority of content was the more traditional ESA Bulletin content (e.g., grant opportunities, job offers, general announcements).

This issue, the pendulum has swung the other way. We have five articles addressing the place of advocacy in science and five articles discussing potential career options for those who have just received their “Doctor” stamp; with several short pieces of ESA news and announcements. As an aside, the two themes in this issue pre-empt events taking place at the ESA Conference.

 

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As the year rolls on, we are solidly preparing for the 2016 ESA conference in Fremantle. Abstracts have now closed and registration is now open for this exciting event. ESA previously had the annual conference at the Esplanade Hotel in Fremantle in 1999: much has changed since then and the Local Organising Committee is busy organising a very exciting event.

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Those of you that have been reading the Bulletin for some years will notice that Ben Gooden is no longer editing the Bulletin. Ben has passed the torch onto me, and hopefully I will not drop it and burn the house down. As my first order of business, I would like to publically thank Ben for his work editing the Bulletin over previous years. Ben doesn’t get off scot-free however as he remains an ESA Director.

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Another ESA annual conference is just around the corner and leading up to this year’s event in  Adelaide the Society is offering a number of incentives to renew membership and spread the word to friends  and colleagues. The Society is proud of the diverse range of opportunities we offer our members with new  initiatives consistently being introduced for students and professionals across all ecology sectors so why not  tell as many people as possible – and win a prize as well! 

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In this special herpetology issssssssssssssue...

It is rare that I go to an ESA meeting or peruse my twitter feed and not hear of some outrageously thrilling herpetological adventure, where a crazed, khaki-clad ecologist is crawling beneath a sandstone overhang in pursuit of a scaly beast that the rest of us would carefully yet hurriedly back away from. This ancient continent of Australia comprises one of the most diverse, endemic, poorly understood but increasingly threatened suite of reptiles and amphibians on the Planet. We have the extremes: some of the fastest, deadliest and biggest reptiles on the planet, for instance. This is exemplified by recent research from the University of Canberra, which shows that male bearded dragons are able to become females in the egg, and those males who do so are often “better mothers” in terms of offspring fitness – marvellous!

So, in the spirit of winter, where all of us are feeling a little more cold-blooded than normal, I thought, why not run a special herpetologically-themed winter issue of the Bulletin, to showcase all these marvellously scaled beasts and the researchers devoting their life to understanding their ecology? In this Bulletin I present the usual suite of news from the ESA Board, starting with an update on strategic development by Nigel Andrew (ESA’s President) and showcase ESA’s student award winners for 2015. I then showcase reports from some of ESA’s leading herpetological ecologists, including Damian Michael, Dustin Welbourne and Annabel Smith. Their contributions explore a wide spectrum of research, from optimal methods to survey reptiles to understanding threats to endangered species on remote islands and optimal restoration strategies to conserve endangered retile populations across anthropogenically-modified landscapes. I really hope that all readers will be as impressed by this novel and world-class research as I have been!

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